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Seeing London


Published ca. 1920s


Tour through central parts of London.


Run time 13:06
Producer Holmes (Burton)
Sponsor N/A
Audio/Visual Si, B&W

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Reviews

Reviewer: Essayist - - March 20, 2015
Subject: Very enjoyable.
Excellent record of times past. As someone has already noted, many of the building are as they are today which is especially surprising when one considers much of London was flattened by German bombers during WW2.

One can't help noticing how black many of the buildings are, which of course was the effect of smoke from the millions of Coal fires that burnt throughout the city in that period. The smoke created the infamous 'London Fog' or more correctly titled 'Smog' which got so bad in the early 1950s it killed thousands and led to the introduction of the 'Clean Air Act'.

All the buildings have now been cleaned back to their original sandstone state, in keeping the much cleaner, dynamic worlds capital city.

The video quality is above average and makes for an enjoyable movie.
Reviewer: radarradar - - April 24, 2013
Subject: More confirmation of 1918 dating
Viewed this today on the rather splendid LINGER App.

The Baseball match(es) between US Army and US Navy took place around football (soccer) stadiums in the UK in 1918.

http://www.questia.com/library/1G1-313797401/royal-match-the-army-navy-service-game-july-4-1918

Here's the link to the App: https://itunes.apple.com/ru/app/linger-films-from-prelinger/id579933465?l=en&mt=8&ign-mpt=uo%3D2
Reviewer: quickfoundnet - - January 12, 2012
Subject: The year is 1918.
The US Army is playing the US Navy at baseball in London. Reckon they were their for a reason, World War I, and went home afterward. Looked it up. There were 8 teams in the Anglo-American Baseball League, and the only references to that league I can find all say the games were played in 1918.

So you are getting a nice look around London in 1918, including Sir Thomas Lipton and King George V.

Not great film, but of substantial historic value.
Reviewer: B. Stockwell - - May 26, 2010
Subject: "Spuzz" is a Speed Viewer
Contrary to what the inept "review" by Spuzz says, the low-ranking Duke is the King of England. Better still, before His Majesty shows up at the very end of this footage, we see Sit Thomas Lipton - sportsman and tea peddler extraordinaire! Blimey!
Reviewer: OnlyMeAgain - - May 5, 2010
Subject: Jun 24, 1918
Trying to find a date:
http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?_r=1&res=9800EEDC173EE433A25756C2A9609C946996D6CF
Opens Washington Inn
YMCA provides a new hotel for American officers in London.
... opened by the Duke of Connaught today.
Jun 24, 1918

Love the mix of pedal, horse, petrol(gas, benzine) and steam. Even seems to be a steam road vehicle emerging from behind the "Cheddar Cheese", as well as a train on a bridge.
Reviewer: jafran - - May 15, 2006
Subject: Seeing London is excellent
Post World War I silent film. Very well filmed. Not only do you get to see many places in London, but get the feeling of people of a long gone era.
Reviewer: Spuzz - - August 29, 2004
Subject: Where's the London Eye?
Nice overview of 1920's London, starting with the Parliament buildings, then going around to St. Pauls Cathedral, the Tower of London, and downing street. The film promises we'd get to see royalty too, but all they could nuster was a VERY low ranking Duke. Otherwise, pretty randy!
Reviewer: Steve Bell - - February 11, 2004
Subject: A Londoner's View
As a born and bred Londoner, I though I'd add my thoughts about this very worthwhile 15 or so minutes.

The primary thing that strikes me is how *little* has changed during the last 80 years! Most of the places shown look identical today. Sure there's probably a few high rise offices blocking some of the views shown in this film, but nothing is unrecognisable.

I wish I could have been there in 1922 to help them write the captions! "The Towers of Parliament" - what? Though they're right about 'St. Stephen's Tower' being the correct name for what most Londoners would now call "Big Ben"

A glaring omission is Buckingham Palace and the Mall. There's no Horse Guards Parade either, even though the film makers were only a few hundred yards away at St. James' Park! Incidentally, I think most of the "colonials" of 1922 would have called Buckingham Palace "The Centre of the British Empire" rather than 10 Downing Street (which I notice is of course ungated in this film - I remember the gates first being put up.)

One strange thing is to see Admiralty Arch being described as "new" - now that sounds odd! Admiralty Arch is the gateway between The Mall and Trafalgar Square.

There's nothing wrong with this little film at all, if you're not British though, take a few of the captions with a pinch of salt, and if you're planning on visiting London, much of this will still look just the same - even down to the model of the old gate in Fleet Street over one of the shops.

Steve Bell.
Reviewer: cashel - - December 1, 2003
Subject: vanished glory
b/w and silent and made aprox. 1922..We see a London that is no longer and can join the many who lament the later war destruction and the modernisation vandalism..However delight in the city vistas. the street scenes with the londerners, the motor buses..Visit #the first large american store in london#...Attend a baseball match with us army playing us navy and viewed by king george v and queen mary. Note the title #the royal party are kindly disposed but puzzled # Then are the tourist,s sites-downing street, the abbey,bank of england ..enjoy
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